First and only FDA-approved medication that may help you stay pregnant longer1

Every week counts when you’re pregnant

Makena® (hydroxyprogesterone caproate injection), pronounced Ma-keen-a, is an FDA-approved hormone medicine (progestin) prescribed to lower the risk of having a preterm baby in women1:

  • Who are pregnant with one baby, and
  • Who’ve unexpectedly delivered one baby too early (before 37 weeks) in the past

Makena is a weekly injection given (every 7 days) by your healthcare provider either at their office or in your home.1
Learn more

Why choose FDA approved?

FDA-approved products, like Makena, provide greater assurance of quality and are held to high quality standards compared to products that are not approved by the FDA.

Learn why this is important

FDA: Food and Drug Administration.

Makena calendar page

Every additional week makes a big difference for your baby

Your baby needs every week of pregnancy to develop.2-4 For example, your baby's brain and lungs are still developing in the last few weeks of pregnancy.4

In clinical studies, taking Makena significantly lowered the rate of preterm birth compared to moms who did not take Makena.1

  • Makena was studied in women who were at risk for having a preterm baby because they had given birth to a preterm baby before1
  • It’s not known whether Makena is safe and effective in women who have other risk factors for preterm birth1
  • Makena is not intended for use to stop active preterm labor1

Only your healthcare provider can prescribe FDA-approved Makena. Ask today if it’s right for you.

Watch a video to find out if Makena is right for you

See if you are at risk for a preterm birth and if Makena is right for youSee more videos

Find out if Makena® (hydroxyprogesterone caproate injection) is right for you

If you have delivered a baby too early in the past, you are at an increased risk for another preterm birth. Find out if Makena may be right for you.

Get the most out of your visit with this useful discussion guide

Kate, Vinny, and their two children
Watch Kate's video

After speaking with her doctor, Kate made a decision to start Makena® (hydroxyprogesterone caproate injection) because she was at risk for another preterm birth. Hear her story.

Kate gave birth to her son, Gabriel, 5 weeks early (35 weeks). When she became pregnant again with a single baby a year later, she learned she was at risk for another preterm birth and discussed Makena with her healthcare provider.

Benefits of using an FDA-approved medicine

Makena is the first and only FDA-approved medicine to reduce the risk of preterm birth in women who are currently pregnant with one baby and who have unexpectedly delivered a baby preterm (before 37 weeks) in the past.1

Makena is made in a facility that follows FDA’s Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs).5,6 Before it was approved, the FDA thoroughly reviewed the safety, efficacy, and manufacturing quality. This ensures quality of the product including5-7:

  • The right drug
  • The right amount of drug
  • Free of contamination
  • Sterile

The majority of drugs used in the United States are FDA approved and made under GMPs. Occasionally, due to a patient’s unique medical need, a pharmacist may need to compound an alternative formulation. Compounded drugs are not FDA approved and should only be prescribed when a patient has a medical need that can’t be met with the approved drug.8

Watch the Jennifer Gudeman, PharmD, video

Learn why FDA approval is importantSee more videos

Understand the benefits of taking an FDA-approved medication

Jennifer Gudeman, PharmD, Vice President, Medical Affairs, Maternal Health, describes the FDA’s statement that FDA-approved medications should be used when medically appropriate rather than compounded formulations, unless there is a specific medical need for the patient.

Using Makena

Makena injection site

Using Makena

  • Makena is an injection given by a healthcare provider1:
    • In the healthcare provider’s office or
    • At home during a home healthcare visit (if covered by your insurance)
  • You will get one injection into your hip (upper outer area of your buttocks) each week until week 37 or until you deliver your baby—whichever happens first1
    • Injections start between week 16 and week 20, 6 days of your pregnancy, depending on your healthcare provider’s direction1

What to expect with your injections of Makena

View a video

Understand how your healthcare provider gives Makena® (hydroxyprogesterone caproate injection)

Nurse Kristina explains what to expect during your Makena injection that is given by a healthcare provider.

Makena injection site

Home injections by healthcare professionals

Weekly injections of Makena may be administered in your home by a trained healthcare professional, if approved by your insurance plan.

Makena may help you stay pregnant longer. See how

Find out if Makena® (hydroxyprogesterone caproate injection) is right for you

If you have delivered a baby too early in the past, she is at an increased risk for another preterm birth. Find out if Makena may be right for you.

Lyn, a Makena patient
See Lyn's story

Lyn was surprised to find out she was at risk for another preterm birth due to her history, so she decided to take action

After her older son Lamar was born 4 weeks early and spent 19 days in the NICU, Lyn wanted to understand what she could do to help improve her chance of achieving a full-term pregnancy with her second child.

Makena for prevention of preterm labor

Makena may help you stay pregnant longer. See how

Find out if Makena® (hydroxyprogesterone caproate injection) is right for you

If you have delivered a baby too early in the past, she is at an increased risk for another preterm birth. Find out if Makena may be right for you.

Is Makena safe?

You and your healthcare provider should consider the benefits and risks of treatment with Makena prior to deciding if Makena is right for you.

Makena risks and patient health conditions Makena risks and patient health conditions

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Watch the Makena possible side effects video

Consider the potential side effects of MakenaSee more videos

What are the potential side effects of Makena® (hydroxyprogesterone caproate injection)?

It's understandable to have a lot of questions about taking a medication while pregnant. Learn more about what to expect when receiving Makena injections so you and your healthcare provider can discuss if Makena is right for you.

What are the potential side effects?

For moms:

Makena may cause serious side effects including1:

  • Blood clots—Symptoms of a blood clot may include leg swelling, redness in your leg, a spot on your leg that is warm to touch, or leg pain that worsens when you bend your foot
  • Allergic reactions—Symptoms of an allergic reaction may include hives, itching, or swelling of the face
  • Depression
  • Yellowing of your skin and the whites of your eyes

The most common adverse reactions observed with Makena were injection site reactions (pain, swelling, itching, bruising, or a hard bump), hives, itching, nausea, and diarrhea.1

In a clinical study, certain complications or events associated with pregnancy occurred more often in women who received Makena. These included miscarriage (pregnancy loss before 20 weeks of pregnancy), stillbirth (fetal death occurring during or after the 20th week of pregnancy), hospital admission for preterm labor, preeclampsia (high blood pressure and too much protein in your urine), gestational hypertension (high blood pressure caused by pregnancy), gestational diabetes, and oligohydramnios (low amniotic fluid levels).1

For babies:

In a follow-up study, children between the ages of 2 and 5 years old were evaluated for development in various physical, mental, and social measures. The results were similar to children born to non–Makena-treated moms.9

Watch a video that reviews possible side effects

Consider the potential side effects of MakenaSee more videos

What are the potential side effects of Makena® (hydroxyprogesterone caproate injection)?

It's understandable to have a lot of questions about taking a medication while pregnant. Learn more about what to expect when receiving Makena injections so you and your healthcare provider can discuss if Makena is right for you.

Get help paying for Makena

Get help paying for Makena. Find out how 

Indication

Makena (hydroxyprogesterone caproate injection) is a prescription hormone medicine (progestin) used to lower the risk of preterm birth in women who are pregnant with one baby and who have delivered one baby too early (preterm) in the past. Makena was shown to work based on a lower number of women who delivered babies at less than 37 weeks of pregnancy. There are no studies showing Makena reduces the number of babies who have serious problems shortly after birth or who die. It is not known whether Makena is safe and effective in women who have other risk factors for preterm birth.

Important Safety Information for Makena (hydroxyprogesterone caproate injection)

Makena should not be used in women with any of the following conditions: blood clots or other blood clotting problems, breast cancer or other hormone-sensitive cancers, or history of these conditions; unusual vaginal bleeding not related to your current pregnancy, yellowing of the skin due to liver problems during pregnancy, liver problems, including liver tumors, or uncontrolled high blood pressure.

Before you receive Makena, tell your healthcare provider if you have an allergy to hydroxyprogesterone caproate, castor oil, or any of the other ingredients in Makena; diabetes or prediabetes, epilepsy, migraine headaches, asthma, heart problems, kidney problems, depression, or high blood pressure.

In a clinical study, certain complications or events associated with pregnancy occurred more often in women who received Makena. These included miscarriage (pregnancy loss before 20 weeks of pregnancy), stillbirth (fetal death occurring during or after the 20th week of pregnancy), hospital admission for preterm labor, preeclampsia (high blood pressure and too much protein in your urine), gestational hypertension (high blood pressure caused by pregnancy), gestational diabetes, and oligohydramnios (low amniotic fluid levels).

Makena may cause serious side effects including blood clots, allergic reactions, depression, and yellowing of your skin and the whites of your eyes. Call your healthcare provider right away if you think you have symptoms of a blood clot (leg swelling, redness in your leg, a spot on your leg that is warm to touch, or leg pain that worsens when you bend your foot) or symptoms of an allergic reaction (hives, itching, or swelling of the face). The most common side effects of Makena include injection site reactions (pain, swelling, itching, bruising, or a hard bump), hives, itching, nausea, and diarrhea.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.

Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see full Prescribing Information for Makena.

References: 1. Makena® (hydroxyprogesterone caproate injection) prescribing information, AMAG Pharmaceuticals, 2016. 2. American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Preterm (premature) labor and birth. http://www.acog.org/~/media/For%20Patients/faq087.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20130207T1252359850. May 2013. Accessed January 5, 2017. 3. March of Dimes. Long-term health effects of premature birth. http://www.marchofdimes.org/baby/long-term-health-effects-of-premature-birth.aspx. October 2013. Accessed January 5, 2017. 4. Engle WA, Tomashek KM, Wallman C. Late-preterm infants: a population at risk. Pediatrics. 2007;120:1390-1401. 5. US Food and Drug Administration. FDA’s drug review process. http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/ucm289601.htm. August 24, 2015. Accessed January 5, 2017. 6. Sellers S, Utian WH. Pharmacy compounding primer for physicians. Drugs. 2012;72:2043-2050. 7. US Food and Drug Administration. Updated FDA statement on compounded versions of hydroxyprogesterone caproate (the active ingredient in Makena). https://wayback.archive-it.org/7993/20170112232040/http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm308546.htm. June 15, 2012. Accessed March 29, 2017. 8. US Food and Drug Administration. Questions and answers on updated FDA statement on compounded versions of hydroxyprogesterone caproate (the active ingredient in Makena). http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm310215.htm. June 29, 2012. Accessed January 5, 2017. 9. Northen AT, Norman GS, Anderson K. Follow-up of children exposed in utero to 17 α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate compared with placebo. Obstet Gynecol. 2007;110:865-872.

Important Safety Information and Indication
INDICATION
IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
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If you are enrolled in the Makena Care Connection or My Adherence Program, please note that our contact information has changed. If you have questions or would like to get in touch, please contact us at 1-800-847-3418, or write to us at info@makenacareconnection.com.